Economía de las Represas Hidroeléctricas - La Paz, Bolivia

Salón Versalles, Hotel Radisson
9:00 a 14:00 hrs.
La Paz, Bolivia

Formulario de Inscripción en Linea

¿Las represas son buenas para la economía, para el medioambiente y para la gente?

Eso Depende !

Algunas represas hidroeléctricas pueden aportar energía confiable y urgentemente necesaria para las comunidades y ciudades con un costo menor para los consumidores y el medio ambiente. Otras represas traen consigo incremento en los precios de electricidad, desplazamiento de las comunidades y desastres medioambientales.

Wild Amazon Chocolate in the Bolivian Market

Series number: 
Wild Cacao

Wild Chocolate in Bolivia

The tree that gives us chocolate is native to the Amazon rain forests. It has long been domesticated and planted commercially in hot, humid climates around the world. But the "wild" cacao beans are still harvested from natural Amazon forests, such as those in Northern Bolivia. CSF helped local communities and our partners at Conservation International assess the Bolivian market for wild rain forest chocolate.

Is Sugarcane a Sweet Deal for Sustainable Development?

Series number: 

Factibilidad económica y financiera de la producción de caña de azúcar y derivados en el norte del departamento de La Paz

Series number: 
Photo of Quiquibey river in Bolivia

Decision-makers Workshop: Developing Economic Analysis Capacity for the Conservation of the Southern Tropical Andes

This Project was launched with a workshop aimed at decision-makers from Bolivia and Peru, held in August 2009 in Lima. The purpose of this workshop was to familiarize representatives from both countries with the tools that economic analysis provides to conservation practice, and to get their feedback on economic research priorities for their on-the-ground conservation programs in southeastern Peru and northern Bolivia. Participants included representatives from government, NGOs and cooperation agencies in both countries.

Picture of sugar mill in northern Bolivia

Sugar Cane in the Bolivian Amazon

Over the past three decades, the Amazonian region in northern Bolivia has experienced a process of agricultural colonization in formerly pristine forestlands.

Forest conversion for agricultural projects is the basis of several national and local government development schemes. As of 2008, the most prominent development proposal in the region involved building a sugar mill and planting more than 20,000 hectares of sugar cane. However, consensus was lacking on whether and how such a project should be implemented, due in part to the absence of any rigorous feasibility studies.

Valoración económica de recursos naturales en Áreas Protegidas de Bolivia/Economic Valuation of Natural Resources of Bolivian Protected Areas

Series number: 
Syndicate content