News

News

Conservation Strategy Fund has just released a milestone study of the costs and benefits of the Illegal Wildlife Trade (IWT) in Southern Africa, in a project financed by USAID. Our findings call for more widespread use of economics to make smarter and more effective investments in curbing IWT.  
Scott Edwards and Jon Mellberg in Akagera National Park. Photo credit: Anonymous.  
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Last year, CSF collaborated with Tanzania National Parks(TANAPA) on an analysis to help the country set its park entrance fees. The study looked at the relationship between expected visitation and entrance fee levels, and found that price sensitivity varies widely by park. The study’s recommendations considered these differences, as well as visitors’ perceptions about a range of issues related to fees, management decisions, and park conditions. Implementation of the study’s recommendations would generate a predicted 25% increase in revenues – providing much needed funds for park management – without negatively effecting visitation.
Photo credit: Rhona Barr CSF and Cheetah Conservation Botswana (CCB) developed a cost-benefit model for ‘cheetah-friendly’ predator control methods. This project was made possible by funding from the Handsel Foundation.
Native Kudu. In September, CSF led several modules in a four-day workshop in Okahandja, Namibia sponsored by the GIZ ValuES program. ValuES is a global project that helps decision-makers integrate ecosystem services into policy making, planning and implementation of specific projects. A key element of the program is training on the selection and application of methods and tools for the assessment and valuation of ecosystem services. The Namibia course is one of several regional training courses taking place around the world in 2015 and 2016.
CSF was recently awarded $100,000 to expand our trainings, analyses, collaborative field work in Africa, thanks to the generosity of the Handsel Foundation.
When people think of sub-Saharan Africa, they are often imagining the landscape of Botswana, although they may be unaware of it. Images of the Kalahari populate the spreads of nature magazines; the mysterious gazes of lions, elephants, and buffalo calling readers to adventure. Admiring photographs such as these in my youth brought me to my current work, and last month I was fortunate enough to have a dream realised and visit the Kalahari myself. CSF, thanks to funding from the Handsel Foundation, is working along with Cheetah Conservation Botswana (CCB) to conduct a cost benefit analysis (CBA) of alternative predator control methods used by small stock farmers in the Kalahari agro-ecosystem.
From June 11-22, 2012, twenty-eight environmental professionals from eight African nations gathered at the Rwenzori International Hotel in Kasese, Uganda to learn how economic approaches can help them address environmental impacts of infrastructure development in the Albertine Rift.
Born in Uganda, Sarah Naigaga first came to CSF as a student at our Economic Tools for Conservation course in 2004 with the hopes of sharpening her analytic skills. At the time, she had been working with Greenwatch, an environmental law organization, and was involved in reviewing the Bujagali hydro dam. She was also selected as a representatives of civic society organizations to review the strategic sectoral, social, and environmental assessment of power development options in the Nile Equatorial Lakes Region. This process exposed her to broader issues of development and allowed her the opportunity for collaboration with a multitude of actors across several countries.