Idioma:

Determinantes de las decisiones sobre el uso del suelo de hogares ribereños de la Amazonía baja peruana

Número de la série: 
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Esta publicación se hace gracias al Programa de Becas de Investigaciones Económicas Aplicadas para la Conservación en la Amazonía Andina de la Unidad de Apoyo de ICAA, un programa de la Agencia de los Estados Unidos para el Desarrollo Internacional (USAID), a través del cual el becario recibió apoyo técnico de CSF para llevar a cabo su investigación y publicación.

Understanding the farm-level economics of Rainforest Alliance certification

CSF is working with the Rainforest Alliance (RA) to design and carry out research on the costs and benefits to farmers of RA certification. The Rainforest Alliance works to conserve biodiversity and improve livelihoods by promoting and evaluating the implementation of globally respected sustainability standards in a variety of fields. These include cocoa, coffee, and tea, among the most important crops grown in biologically important regions. RA certifies a major portion of global supply of some of these crops, including more than 130,000 cocoa farms in 11 countries.

Game Theory Goes Native

conservation economics CSF strategy fund

Game theory emerged in the 1940’s as a math-driven, esoteric science of how people alternately cooperate and compete to get what they want. It’s been used in business, diplomacy and military strategies and won famed Princeton economist John Nash the Nobel Prize in 1994. Now, far from the halls of academia and the corridors of power, it’s also being used to conserve nature.

Wild Chocolate

success stories conservation economics CSF strategy fund

We found this long bridge that connected a rainforest community and consumers in the city,” says Alfonso Malky. “It was made of chocolate.”

In 2011, CSF’s Malky discovered a complex, but promising web of connections between economics, the environment, and the human condition when he created a market study for the Bolivian chocolate company Selva Cacao (“Jungle Chocolate”).

Do you want help designing an analysis or research project?

CSF is opening a program of “office hours” with experts who will help you figure out what to analyze and how. These consultations are free and an exclusive service for graduates of CSF courses..

Here’s how it works: Click on the link below and provide some basic information about the issue, problem, policy or activity you want to analyze. We’ll gather the ideas and set up a meeting for you with a member of our staff or one of our consulting experts via videoconference or telephone.

Examples of analyses we will help you design could include

• cost-benefit analysis of a sustainable development project,
• revenue strategy for a protected area,
• formulation of arguments to confront a specific environmental threat,
• economic valuation of an ecosystem or protected area,

Diary of a course graduate: Anita Escobedo

I am pleased to write an update on the activities and conservation initiatives that I have been working on after attending Conservation Strategy Fund’s 2012 course, Economic Tools for Conservation, in Stanford, CA.

Sustainable economic development in Yap

CSF is helping Yap State in the Federated States of Micronesia design a framework for sustainable economic development. Key stakeholders will explore scenarios for future development, learn how to measure environmental, social, cultural and economic impacts of different types of programs, and evaluate the potential of proposed projects to achieve sustainable development. This effort is one of several analysis projects being conducted in Micronesia following CSF's Economic Tools for Conservation in Micronesia course held in March of 2012.

Image of Brazilian cattle at the edge of the rainforest

Subsidies, Credit and Cattle in Southern Amazonas

Cattle ranching is a leading cause of deforestation in the Amazon Basin. Forests are razed for pasture when landowners perceive that more profits can be made from cows than from the various products of the intact forest. This calculation is influenced by the availability of subsidized credit, long used a tool to drive economic expansion on the agricultural frontier.

CSF graduate takes on the sugar industry with economic analysis

Ronald Kaggwa, CSF alum

An hour drive from Kampala lies the Mabira Forest, one of the few remaining natural forest reserves in Uganda. Rich in biological diversity, the forest contributes to the livelihood of the adjacent communities and provides an opportunity for ecotourism. In 2009 the Sugar Corporation of Uganda Limited (SCOUL) requested permission from the government to use part of the Mabira Central Forest Reserve for sugarcane growing. CSF graduate Ronald Kaggwa took action. An environmental economist at the Uganda National Environmental Management Authority (NEMA), Ronald conducted an economic analysis to prove that the net benefits of conservation far outweighed those of sugarcane.

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