Idioma:

smart energy + transportation infrastructure

Infrastructure investments in remote areas can transform landscapes and watersheds, unleashing irreversible, destructive change. Projects' impacts vary considerably and their approval is dependent on small groups of public decision-makers. Investments, especially remote roads, are often economically inefficient and usually have unnecessarily large environmental and social impacts. These characteristics - variable quality, concentrated decision-making, economic flaws and design shortcomings - add up to a big conservation opportunity, one in which good economic analyses can be influential. CSF's Smart Energy + Transportation Infrastructure program provides training to conservationists and decision-makers, as well as comprehensive cost-benefit analyses of infrastructure projects, such as dams and roads. Keen understanding of these projects at multiple levels of society will result in better decisions and large-scale conservation gains.

CSF begins analysis of proposed dam in Brazil's Tapajós river basin

ecosystem services tapajos para brazil
Tapajós river basin, Pará State, Brazil © Camila Jericó-Daminello

After an inventory of potential dams in the Tapajós river basin was released in 2008, the area has been hailed as the new frontier of energy development in Brazil. Due to the typically extensive environmental and social impacts of dam construction, governments and communities in the Amazon region have been engaged in discussions over the past few years on how to mitigate impacts on people and nature. Some dam projects are already underway with many more on the drawing board.

What is Conservation Economics?

conservation economics CSF strategy fund
Photo credit: Fernanda Preto

There’s no Wikipedia page so you can be forgiven for suspecting that I’m making it up. But Conservation Economics is actually being practiced by a bunch of serious people engaged in one of the most profound challenges of our time - averting massive losses in the diversity of Earth's life forms. So if it doesn’t exist, it’s time we brought it into being. Here goes:

CSF presentó la conferencia “Infraestructura y Conservación: Caso Pucallpa – Cruzeiro do Sul”, de la COP 20

El pasado 2 de diciembre CSF presentó la conferencia “Infraestructura y Conservación: Caso Pucallpa – Cruzeiro do Sul”, en el Pabellón Bosques (Voces por el Clima) de la COP 20 (Lima, Perú).

En el evento se presentaron dos investigaciones desarrolladas al respecto, dando a conocer los desafíos del proyecto de interconexión vial entre las dos ciudades y sus posibles implicancias ambientales y sociales en términos de pérdidas en biodiversidad, así como en términos de costos y beneficios monetarios para la sociedad.

CSF

Jamaica can have its goat and eat it too

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Lone fishing boat, Jamaica

Jamaica’s Goat Islands are the center of what has often been portrayed as a classic development-versus-environment conflict.

Fishing boat Jamaica Goat Islands port China Harbour Engineering Company

An economic comparison of alternatives to building a port on Goat Islands, Jamaica

In 2013, Jamaica’s Ministry of Transport, Works and Housing announced that the China Harbour Engineering Company (CHEC) had selected the area on and around the Goat Islands to build a major transhipment port and accompanying industrial complex. Due to the location of the proposed site in the core of the Portland Bight Protected Area, reactions have been heated.

The Goat Islands are not the best site for the transshipment port!

An international study shows there may be better, cheaper and less environmentally damaging alternative sites for the proposed transshipment port and logistics hub.

Kingston, Jamaica: The Conservation Strategy Fund (CSF), today announced the findings of a cost-effectiveness assessment of four potential sites for the proposed transshipment port that China Harbour Engineering Company (CHEC) is proposing to build. CSF’s recommendations were presented to a group of senior decision-makers at a meeting at the Courtleigh Hotel today.

The Price is Right, Not

I remember noticing on a trip to Brazil in 2001 that compact-flourescent lightbulbs were colonizing the country's light sockets with startling speed. It hadn't been raining and the drought was idling hydroelectric dams that accounted for more than 90% of electricity. The resulting blackouts, referred to as "apagões," changed people's behavior. Consumers slashed their energy consumption and solved the crisis. The rains eventually came and the outages faded into memory.

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