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Analysis

Conservation Strategy Fund helps local conservationists use economic tools to find smart, efficient solutions to the most urgent environmental problems. Since its creation in 1998, CSF has conducted dozens of analysis projects in forests, rivers and coastal environments. Most of our work has focused in the tropics, where extraordinarily high levels of biological diversity are found. To maximize the reach and quality of our work, we involve leading experts and conservation organizations in all of our projects.

Customized Training and Mentored Policy Research on Integrated Landscape Policy & Economics

In September 2018, CSF completed a program to promote integrated landscape approaches for sustainable forests and land use policy and management at the sub-national level in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. The specific objectives of the program were to:

Conservation Finance Curriculum Development

CSF has received a grant from Blue Solutions to support curriculum development on conservation finance. This will add to the current suite of Blue Solutions trainings that include marine spatial planning, climate change adaptation, and integrating ecosystem services into marine and coastal development.

Increasing the Sustainability of Mangrove Management

CSF collaborated with NatureServe and Pronatura Veracruz on a project for the Inter-American Development Bank to create a replicable model for mangrove ecosystem management. This model built on engagement of local communities using ecological condition assessment, economic valuation, and development of alternative livelihoods. The project focused on the Alvarado Lagoon System in Veracruz, Mexico, a RAMSAR-recognized wetland of global importance. CSF’s primary role in this project was leading the economics, with a focus on helping communities perceive and develop solutions to the market challenges they face in transitioning to sustainability.

Multiplier Effects of Tourism Spending in Peru’s National Parks

Photo: Liz Bailón, Paracas National Reserve

With support from the Andes Amazon Fund, CSF conducted an analysis on multiplier effects of tourism spending in Peru’s national parks. Peru has created eleven national parks and numerous other protected areas in its Andes Amazon region covering approximately 18 million hectares. While efforts are currently under way to address existing funding gaps, the long term financial sustainability of Peru’s protected areas requires a substantial, long-term increase in allocation of public funds. Furthermore, Peru’s biological importance justifies expansion of the existing protected area system in the Andes Amazon, further increasing funding required.

Capacity Building and Technical Support for Parques Nacionales Naturales de Colombia

Colombia is one of the most biodiverse countries in the world. The country's fifty-nine protected areas are managed by Parques Nacionales de Colombia (PNNC) who hope to use Payments for Environmental Services (PES) to stimulate conservation and restoration of ecosystems. With support from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, CSF provided capacity building and technical support to support PNNC in this endeavor.

Promoting Forest Conservation in Brazil: Identifying Challenges and Opportunities of the Design and Implementation of the Environmental Reserves Quotas (CRA) Market's State Regulations

CSF-Brazil conducted a study to subsidize the design and implementation processes of the Cotas de Reserva Ambiental (CRA, Environmental Reserve Quotas) market regulations by the Brazilian States to help conserve the forest in a more economically efficient and environmentally sound way.

Strengthening the participation of private sector and Bolivian society in conservation

With support from the Good Energies Foundation, CSF is developing an innovative platform in Bolivia called PIENSA Verde to improve conservation by promoting greater participation and awareness among society.

In 2017, we conducted a feasibility assessment of the concept that indicated that implementing a platform like PIENSA Verde was indeed possible. This conclusion was based on (1) private sector interest in the platform, (2) multiple NGOs expressing interest in being a part of PIENSA Verde´s portfolio of projects, and (3) individuals expressing willingness to contribute monetarily to the platform.

Scenario Planning in North Aceh

CSF Indonesia led a multi-stakeholder sustainable development planning process for the North Aceh Regency. This planning process included two workshops. The first was a Scenario Planning Workshop, which generated an optimum scenario for North Aceh in the year 2032. The second was the Development Planning Workshop, which translated and embedded the scenario, vision, and mission into actual development programs. Participant represented CSOs and government agencies, as well as local stakeholders.

Results of this process are expected to be adopted to become the technocratic draft of the medium-term development plan by the regency government.

Contributing to the decision-making process about hydropower plants in the Brazilian Amazon region: Study of the financial feasibility and potential impacts of the Castanheira Dam

Conservação Estratégica (CSF-Brazil), in partnership with Instituto Centro de Vida (ICV, Institute of Life Center), International Rivers and Operação Amazônia Nativa (OPAN, Native Amazon Operation), carried out a detailed study on the construction of the proposed Castanheira hydropower plant on the Arinos river, in the state of Mato Grosso, Brazil. This study had three goals: (1) evaluate the financial feasibility of the project; (2) contribute to the analysis of socio-environmental impacts associated with the construction of hydroelectric dams in the Amazon region; and (3) provide information to decision makers about this type of infrastructure through a cost-benefit analysis of the dam.

Local economic costs of the proposed Isiolo dam: A scoping study

CSF conducted a desk-based study of potential local costs associated with the construction of the proposed Isiolo Dam in the Ewaso Ng’iro River in Kenya.

The dam has been identified by Kenya’s National Water Conservation and Pipeline Corporation as necessary to improve local livelihood by providing water for domestic and livestock use, small irrigation activities, and in the future, for tourists in the proposed Isiolo Resort City.

However, there has also been opposition to the proposed construction, based on concerns that the dam could expose herders downstream to drought, negatively affect endangered wildlife, and put the local wildlife-tourism based economy at risk.