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Training Partner Network launched in Mexico and Bhutan

CSF is launching its Training Partner Network as part of our Conservation Economics Initiative to bring economics training to more conservation professionals around the world.  This effort is made possible thanks to a grant from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

One of the cornerstones of the Initiative is a network of CSF Training Partner organizations offering conservation economics training in parts of the world where we do not have our own training teams.  The Network will be supported by CSF and by our academic partners throughout the globe.

Análisis de costos del programa COMSERBO en el Departmento de Pando, Bolivia

El Programa Conservación y Manejo Sostenible Estratégico del Recurso Bosque (COMSERBO) es una iniciativa del gobierno regional del Departamento de Pando en Bolivia. Se trata de un mecanismo de incentivos económicos que reconoce el manejo sostenible del recurso forestal y, genera posibilidades de desarrollo a través del pago de un monto determinado y la provisión de asesoría técnica a las comunidades que conservan sus bosques, para el desarrollo de emprendimientos sostenibles. COMSERBO trabaja actualmente con 7 comunidades, cubriendo aproximadamente 69.307 hectáreas y beneficiando a 196 familias. El programa tiene planes de expandirse y beneficiar a más de 5.000 familias en los próximos 5 años y abarcar un millón de hectáreas de bosque.

Leopards, Tigers and Bears - A Work in Progress

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There’s one park in the Kingdom of Bhutan where the ranges of the Royal Bengal Tiger, the snow leopard and Himalayan black bear overlap and where communities have lived in harmony with nature for hundreds of years. A trekker’s paradise, Jigme Dorji National Park is also known for it’s astounding biodiversity, breathtaking alpine meadows and majestic snow-capped mountains. But, until recently, it was missing one thing: proper campsites.

Game Theory Goes Native

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Game theory emerged in the 1940’s as a math-driven, esoteric science of how people alternately cooperate and compete to get what they want. It’s been used in business, diplomacy and military strategies and won famed Princeton economist John Nash the Nobel Prize in 1994. Now, far from the halls of academia and the corridors of power, it’s also being used to conserve nature.

Brazil's Fernando de Noronha Park

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From Acadia to Zion, Big Bend to Yosemite, U.S. citizens take them for granted: signs and stairs, benches and bathrooms. Invisible as it may be, infrastructure is key to a park’s value proposition. Visitors willingly pay for a park experience that includes beauty, awe, and a few safeguards and conveniences. And people will defend what they love, which is why we wanted to help them get to know, and love, the Fernando de Noronha National Marine Park.

Bringing CSF’s Conservation Economic Tools Training to Development Banks

Last month, we had the opportunity to bring CSF’s economic analysis training to a new audience – the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) in Washington D.C.  The IDB approves over $11 billion dollars in loans each year, and is a major force in shaping the face of development in Latin America.  We delivered two training workshops for transport and water sector specialists from various country offices, and a shorter session for IDB Economists based in D.C.

Capturing Value at Bolivia's Most Visited Park

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The Arbol de Piedra, or “Stone Tree,” is a lone 20-foot rock that has been sculpted by wind and sand to look like a resilient yet stunted tree. It’s a good metaphor for the tough life on the Andean high plains, and the icon of Bolivia’s Eduardo Abaroa National Wildlife Reserve.

Safari Economics: Making More of Tanzania's Megafauna

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http://conservation-strategy.org?1384467323

Tanzania’s national parks teem with the big storybook animals: rhinoceroses, lions, elephants and hippopotami.  Only a few parks however, have historically teemed with visitors.

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