Language:

CSF celebrates its 15th birthday with 15 stories of success

conservation economics CSF strategy fund

Since 1998, Conservation Strategy Fund has been committed to making conservation efforts smarter through the use of economics. To celebrate, we're going to be sharing 15 stories over the course of the next few weeks. Each of these stories reflects how CSF's unique training and research programs equip people with the ability to both calculate and articulate the benefits of doing development right. Read our first story below and follow the series through our blog or on Facebook, and share your story at info@conservation-strategy.org.

Do you want help designing an analysis or research project?

CSF is opening a program of “office hours” with experts who will help you figure out what to analyze and how. These consultations are free and an exclusive service for graduates of CSF courses..

Here’s how it works: Click on the link below and provide some basic information about the issue, problem, policy or activity you want to analyze. We’ll gather the ideas and set up a meeting for you with a member of our staff or one of our consulting experts via videoconference or telephone.

Examples of analyses we will help you design could include

• cost-benefit analysis of a sustainable development project,
• revenue strategy for a protected area,
• formulation of arguments to confront a specific environmental threat,
• economic valuation of an ecosystem or protected area,

Imazon: Brazilian parks near big infrastructure are more deforested

That doesn't really seem like news. We've known for a long time, intuitively and then empirically, that deforestation happens in places with easier access. Roads in the Amazon and other remote regions have been the most important vectors of deforestation. Farming in places where you can get supplies in and produce out cheaply is economically attractive.

Financial Mechanisms for Environmental Compliance in Infrastructure Projects

Series number: 
5
photo of river in the Bolivian Amazon

Cost-benefit analysis of the Cachuela Esperanza Hydroelectric Project

The Cachuela Esperanza hydroelectric mega-project is part of the South American Infrastructure Integration Initiative (IIRSSA). It refers to a 990MW hydroelectric dam that would be built on the Beni River on the outskirts of the Cachuela Esperanza village. This would provide energy to populations in Northern Bolivia and would allow the exportation of electricity to Brazil. The feasibility report, as ordered by the Bolivian government, shows that the environmental and social damages caused by this project would be massive - more than 900Km2 flooded and almost 100,000 people affected. Despite these impacts, the government considers this to be a beneficial project and has continually vowed the desire to move forward with it.

Costos y beneficios del proyecto hidroeléctrico del río Inambari

En junio de 2010, los gobiernos de Perú y Brasil firmaron un Acuerdo Energético que prevé que compañías brasileñas construyan en ríos de la Amazonía peruana centrales hidroeléctricas para exportar energía al Brasil. El proyecto hidroeléctrico del río Inambari, con una potencia instalada de 2,200 megavatios, es el primero de cinco posibles proyectos en contar con un Estudio de Factibilidad (EF) realizado por la compañía promotora EGASUR.

Biodiversity Understanding in Infrastructure and Landscape Development (BUILD)

Through an agreement with the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and support from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Conservation Strategy Fund (CSF) has launched a comprehensive initiative in central Africa, expand CSF’s programs in the Andes-Amazon region, and initiate a limited program in Asia’s Himalayan region. The goal of the program is to promote biodiversity conservation through infrastructure best practices.

Costos y beneficios del proyecto hidroeléctrico del río Inambari

Series number: 
23
Syndicate content