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What is Conservation Economics?

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Photo credit: Fernanda Preto

There’s no Wikipedia page so you can be forgiven for suspecting that I’m making it up. But Conservation Economics is actually being practiced by a bunch of serious people engaged in one of the most profound challenges of our time - averting massive losses in the diversity of Earth's life forms. So if it doesn’t exist, it’s time we brought it into being. Here goes:

Shansho peru madre de dios jungle amazon environmental compensation

Assessing the Peruvian biodiversity offset scheme and the potential role of protected areas

In December 2014, Peru's Ministry of the Environment made a major policy announcement in a ministerial resolution that established guidelines for developers to offset the residual impacts of their projects. The policy was several years in the making and the product of exhaustive analysis on the part of ministry staff and important policy support from CSF and several other organizations, including the Peruvian Society for Environmental Law, The Nature Conservancy and the Wildlife Conservation Society.

The Price is Right, Not

I remember noticing on a trip to Brazil in 2001 that compact-flourescent lightbulbs were colonizing the country's light sockets with startling speed. It hadn't been raining and the drought was idling hydroelectric dams that accounted for more than 90% of electricity. The resulting blackouts, referred to as "apagões," changed people's behavior. Consumers slashed their energy consumption and solved the crisis. The rains eventually came and the outages faded into memory.

Tenosique: Environmental economic analysis of a hydroelectric project on the Usumacinta River

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Moving towards Greener Infrastructure: Innovative Legal Solutions to Common Challenges

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Moving towards greener infrastructure: Innovative legal solutions to common challenges

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Financial incentives for green infrastructure

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Analysis of Infrastructure from a Conservation Economics Perspective - Bhutan 2014

Twenty-two participants representing 3 countries and 15 organizations attended CSF's Analysis of Infrastructure from a Conservation Economics Perspective course in Bumthang, Bhutan. During the five-day course, participants gained an understanding of our core curriculum which includes Microeconomics, Natural Resource Economics, Environmental Valuation, and Cost-Benefit Analysis. Additional topics tailored for the region and sector of focus included Environmental Management and Policy, Infrastructure Best-Practice, and relevant case studies. Instructors were drawn from CSF, University of Brasilia, and Cambridge Resources International. Many thanks to our partners at UWICE for working with us to put on an excellent training!

 


 

CSF brings together journalists and conservation experts at forum in Brasilia

On November 12th, in Brasília, Brazil, 30 journalists from the Amazonian regional media as well as from the national and international outlets attended an infrastructure-focused workshop organized by CSF-Brasil. These professionals hailed from various organizations including O Eco, IPAM, IMAZON, WWF, and TNC. John Lyons of the Wall Street Journal, Wilson Cabral of Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica, and Paul E. Little, anthropologist and infrastructure expert, were also in attendance. Speakers shared information about the impacts of infrastructure projects on ecosystem services in the Amazon. The event provided a forum to discuss infrastructure project planning as well as key environmental, social, economic and legal issues that need to be understood by society.

Shaping Shipping: the Panama Canal

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One of CSF’s central ideas is that we can change the world by grabbing levers connecting to very big things, and pulling at the right time. The Panama Canal qualifies as a very big thing. The hundred-year-old waterway has been the most transformative piece of infrastructure in the Western Hemisphere and, in 2000, was set to transform Panama all over again. That’s when CSF helped a small, local organization pull on one of those levers for change.

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