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São Luiz do Tapajós Dam Construction: Economic Impact and Analysis of Ecosystem Services’ Provision

CSF conducted a study on the economic impact that São Luiz do Tapajós could have had on local populations if its construction in the Brazilian Amazon had been approved.

We analyzed the loss of subsistence income and the impact on two ecosystem services: water quality reduction and the increase of CO2 equivalent emissions.

CSF Tajapós Dam impactsTraditional houses in the Tapajós riverside.

Economic impacts of the "São Luiz do Tapajós" dam’s construction: an analysis of ecosystem services’ provision

Series number: 
48

You can learn more about this project by reading our blog posts on the  field trips, project progress, workshops and events, as well as local news related to the project region.

Plans for Amazon Dam Cancelled

ecosystem services tapajos para brazil
Tapajós river basin, Pará State, Brazil © Camila Jericó-Daminello

On August 4, Brazil's federal environmental agency, IBAMA, formally suspended the environmental licensing process for a proposed dam on the Tapajós River, a "blue water" tributary of the Amazon. The river flows from the south, off Brazil's central plateau, its clear waters sculpting white sand beaches and it winds toward the main stem of the Amazon.

BUILD Synthesis Report

From 2011-2015, CSF engaged in a comprehensive global initiative through the Biodiversity Understanding in Infrastructure and Landscape Development (BUILD) program of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). This report highlights key elements of this multi-year, multi-continent set of infrastructure related projects, and includes an appendix of all activities by region.

Economic impacts of the construction of São Luiz do Tapajós hydroelectric dam

Tapajos Brazil conservation strategy fund

The region of the Tapajós basin is considered the new frontier of energy expansion in Brazil. Specifically the São Luiz do Tapajós hydroelectric project, the largest planned for the basin. If it is built, many ecosystem services will be impacted, influencing the well being of hundreds of local people who depend on them. In this perspective, CSF conducted a study that sought to understand the economic impacts on the services provided to local populations.

Alumni Spotlight: Rushikesh Chavan

conservation economics CSF strategy fundRushikesh Chavan at Pench River between Maharashtra and M.P. Photo courtesy of Ishwar Uikey

CSF-Brazil on a workshop about "Dams in Tapajós River"

On 21st June, CSF-Brazil participated of a workshop about “Dams in Tapajós River”, held in PUC University (Brazil). It was an opportunity to debate with students, professors and other NGOs the subject of huge infrastructures in Amazon and its implications on social and environmental issues.

The Heinrich Böll Stiftung made a report about this event and also an interview with Camila Jericó-Daminello, who is conducting the CSF’s study about the São Luiz do Tapajós dam, planned for the same river.

This was repost with permission from Heinrich Böll Foundation – Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

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Corredeiras de Sao Luis do Tapajos no Brasil

São Luiz do Tapajós Dam: economic impacts and ecosystem services losses for local and regional populations

Ecosystems provide a variety of ecosystem services (ES) to society. Ecosystem services are benefit people obtain from ecosystem, as food or fresh water for example. Despite the importance of ES, they are still largely invisible in decision making, as in the case of the Tapajós River basin in Brazil.

CSF begins analysis of proposed dam in Brazil's Tapajós river basin

ecosystem services tapajos para brazil
Tapajós river basin, Pará State, Brazil © Camila Jericó-Daminello

After an inventory of potential dams in the Tapajós river basin was released in 2008, the area has been hailed as the new frontier of energy development in Brazil. Due to the typically extensive environmental and social impacts of dam construction, governments and communities in the Amazon region have been engaged in discussions over the past few years on how to mitigate impacts on people and nature. Some dam projects are already underway with many more on the drawing board.

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