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Oceans & Fish

Oceans and coastal environments are home to tremendous biodiversity, provide food to over a billion people, and livelihoods for hundreds of millions more. But fisheries are common-pool resources and therefore subject to systematic overexploitation. Economic analysis, in combination with sound biological assessments, can help create the political will and technical knowledge to implement strong fisheries management (or co-management) systems, marine protected areas, and ocean infrastructure that maintain the economic value of fisheries and oceans over the long term. CSF’s Oceans and Fish program provides training for local resource managers and targeted economic analyses to guide public investments and policy decisions.

CSF launches new video on International Training

Watch this short video and hear from our students why they attended our 11th annual International Training in Economic Tools for Conservation at Stanford University in California in August 2009. The students came from all corners of the globe: Indonesia, Cameroon, Haiti, Bhutan, Colombia, Brazil and beyond. Watch the video, below, or by clicking here for our You Tube site.

Education and Training For Tropical Ecosystem Conservation

British Columbia Salmon Aquaculture

Open net-pen salmon aquaculture is now an established part of the economy in several regions of coastal British Columbia. Despite the prevalence of salmon aquaculture in these regions, the industry continues to come under scrutiny. Environmentalists and conservation biologists worry about the impacts of net-pen salmon aquaculture. Community leaders and development advocates are concerned about the economic sustainability of salmon aquaculture and its impacts on rural economies, especially those economies that traditionally have depended on the harvest of wild salmon.

Ocean Economics - Coiba National Park, Panama

Conservation Strategy Fund (CSF) conducted economic valuation research of Marine areas in Belize, Panama, and Brazil. This work was supported by Conservation International’s Marine Management Area Science program and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation. Valuation of ecosystem goods and services was carried out within three formally protected marine areas: Gladden Spit (Belize), Coiba (Panama) and Abrolhos (Brazil). CSF's Coiba research was led by one of our training graduates, Ricardo Montenegro, of the Alliance for Conservation and Development, a Panamanian NGO.

Ocean Economics - Gladden Spit, Belize

Conservation Strategy Fund (CSF) conducted economic valuation research of Marine areas in Belize, Panama and Brazil. This work was supported by Conservation International’s Marine Management Area Science program. Valuation of ecosystem goods and services was carried out within three formally protected marine areas: Gladden Spit (Belize), Coiba (Panama) and Abrolhos (Brazil).

Paracas Reserve

Paracas National Reserve in Peru is home to several species of sea lions, otters, vast anchovetta schools, blue-footed boobies, Inca terns, pink flamingos, pelicans, dolphins and large stocks of scallops. The large reserve has been bolstered in recent years by a volunteer park ranger program, which brings in students to maintain the protected area, clean the beaches and provide outreach to nearby communities. Despite its many contributions, funding for this program is constantly in doubt. In 2000, Course graduate Cecilia Rivas, a biologist and now a professor at the San Ignacio de Loyola University, used skills she learned from CSF to demonstrate the value of the volunteers.

Photo of yellow fishing boat on beach in Abrolhos

Abrolhos Marine Reserve Economic Monitoring

Abrolhos literally means "eye opener". The Abrolhos reef in Brazil won its name because of its unique coral formations and because its shallow waters are frequented by large numbers of reproducing humpback whales. The peculiar mushroom-shaped coral heads there are composed mostly of species completely unique to Abrolhos. The high degree of species "endemism" (uniqueness) is a result of Abrolhos' total isolation from other coral reefs.

Closing in on environmentally sound salmon aquactulture: A fresh look at the economics of closed tank systems

International Economic Tools Course August 10-21, Stanford University, USA

Course participants at Golden Gate Bridge

CSF held its 2009 International Economic Tools Course from August 10-12, 2009 at Stanford University in California, USA.

During the two-week course, participants learned to use economics to be more strategic and successful in their conservation work. Participants studied natural resource and environmental economics, practiced communication and negotiation techniques, and got hands-on experience with cost-benefit analysis.

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