Language:

Oceans & Fish

Oceans and coastal environments are home to tremendous biodiversity, provide food to over a billion people, and livelihoods for hundreds of millions more. But fisheries are common-pool resources and therefore subject to systematic overexploitation. Economic analysis, in combination with sound biological assessments, can help create the political will and technical knowledge to implement strong fisheries management (or co-management) systems, marine protected areas, and ocean infrastructure that maintain the economic value of fisheries and oceans over the long term. CSF’s Oceans and Fish program provides training for local resource managers and targeted economic analyses to guide public investments and policy decisions.

Fishers' welfare Natuna waters post IUU Fishing policy implementation

Perikanan Natuna dan kesejahteraan nelayan pasca penerapan kebijakan IUU Fishing

Calculation model of economic losses due to illegal fishing activities in Indonesian territorial waters

Investing in fisheries management: assessment of FADs and unreported catch

Investasi dalam pengelolaan perikanan: kajian rumpon dan penanganan ikan tak

Identification and development strategy of alternative livelihoods in the candidate marine protected area in Depapre Bay, Jayapura Regency, Papua

Identifikasi dan strategi pembangunan mata pencaharian alternatif masyarakat lokal di calon kawasan konservasi perairan teluk Depapre, Kabupaten Jayapura, Papua

Building Momentum for Better Fisheries Management in Western Indonesia

FMA711TrainingPhotos
Participants enjoying themselves between training sessions.

Fisheries Management Area 711 Training

In 2010, Indonesia was divided into eleven Fisheries Management Areas (FMA) by the Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries (MMAF). The FMA were selected based on their fish resources and biophysical environments, and include capture fisheries, aquaculture, conservation, research, and fisheries development activities. FMA 711, which encompasses the Karimata Strait, Natuna Sea, and the South China Sea, is a strategic fishing ground in Indonesia, with an estimated fishery potential of 1.1 million tons/year, or 11% of the total catch for the country. Six provinces are part of this FMA: Riau, Bangka Belitung, South Sumatra, Jambi, Riau Islands, and West Kalimantan.

Syndicate content