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Oceans & Fish

Oceans and coastal environments are home to tremendous biodiversity, provide food to over a billion people, and livelihoods for hundreds of millions more. But fisheries are common-pool resources and therefore subject to systematic overexploitation. Economic analysis, in combination with sound biological assessments, can help create the political will and technical knowledge to implement strong fisheries management (or co-management) systems, marine protected areas, and ocean infrastructure that maintain the economic value of fisheries and oceans over the long term. CSF’s Oceans and Fish program provides training for local resource managers and targeted economic analyses to guide public investments and policy decisions.

New publication launch: strategies for conserving mangroves in Brazil's protected areas

CSF-Brazil is pleased to announce the launch of a new publication (in Portuguese): "The values of ecosystem services of the Brazilian mangroves, economic instruments for its conservation and the Salgado Paraense case study".

Roughly 90% of mangroves in Brazil are located in protected areas (PA). However, there are important deficiencies in financial sustainability and resource management that affect natural capital stocks, biodiversity and thus, local communities.

Training for Fisheries Policy Makers in Indonesia

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Some of the enthusiastic participants in the workshop

In Indonesia, human and development activities have a significant impact on marine ecosystems and the health of fisheries - one of the most important industries in the country. Economic solutions to these issues are often overlooked, though can be among the most effective. To address this, CSF-Indonesia is seeking to empower policy makers in the Indonesian Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries (MMAF) with specific economic tools and knowledge to support them in formulating policies to conserve and sustainably manage marine resources.

Policy Makers Workshop: Economic Tools for Marine Conservation and Sustainable Fisheries

 

On March 25th - 29th 2018, we held a five-day workshop on the use of economic tools and knowledge to support Indonesian Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries (MMAF) in formulating policies to conserve and sustainably manage marine resources. Twenty-seven participants from different technical roles across various departments at MMAF were present.

 

Upcoming Policy Makers Workshop for Indonesia’s Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries

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Participants working on a group exercise at a previous CSF training in Indonesia. Photo credit: Niki Gribi

What do fishermen truly stand to lose from the creation of large MPAs? Comparing claims with actual economic costs

CSF is investigating the fishing-related opportunity costs of existing large-scale marine protected areas (MPAs) using Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument (PMNM), Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument (PRI), the Palau National Sanctuary (PNS) and the Phoenix Islands Protected Area (PIPA) as case studies. Specifically, CSF is working to evaluate the extent to which fishing regulations have been implemented at each MPA.

Second Marine Fellowship Program Workshop in Tanjung Pinang

Photo for Second MFP Story
Photo credits: UMRAH

In early 2017, six researchers were awarded a grant as part of CSF’s Indonesia Marine Fellows Program (MFP). The six fellows were selected based on their research topics, which seek to answer pertinent questions about fisheries management challenges in Indonesia. The fellows were also paired with mentors who are experts in their respective fields.

Regional Symposium: The Value of Nature

The Regional Symposium: "The Value of Nature", took place in Quito, Ecuador, from the 27th of November to December 1, 2017. The event was held at the Hotel Quito, and included a combination of plenary sessions, training, and interactive sessions on the topic of quantification and valuation of ecosystem services for sustainable development.  Attendees were able to choose from a combination of sessions led by experts from the Natural Capital Project (NatCap) and Conservation Strategy Fund (CSF). For attendees working in coastal and marine contexts, the central themes included the assessment of the risks to habitat and marine protected areas.

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