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smart energy + transportation infrastructure

Infrastructure investments in remote areas can transform landscapes and watersheds, unleashing irreversible, destructive change. Projects' impacts vary considerably and their approval is dependent on small groups of public decision-makers. Investments, especially remote roads, are often economically inefficient and usually have unnecessarily large environmental and social impacts. These characteristics - variable quality, concentrated decision-making, economic flaws and design shortcomings - add up to a big conservation opportunity, one in which good economic analyses can be influential. CSF's Smart Energy + Transportation Infrastructure program provides training to conservationists and decision-makers, as well as comprehensive cost-benefit analyses of infrastructure projects, such as dams and roads. Keen understanding of these projects at multiple levels of society will result in better decisions and large-scale conservation gains.

Tenosique: Environmental economic analysis of a hydroelectric project on the Usumacinta River

Series number: 
21

Moving towards Greener Infrastructure: Innovative Legal Solutions to Common Challenges

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6

Moving towards greener infrastructure: Innovative legal solutions to common challenges

Series number: 
20

Training Partner Network launched in Mexico and Bhutan

CSF is launching its Training Partner Network as part of our Conservation Economics Initiative to bring economics training to more conservation professionals around the world.  This effort is made possible thanks to a grant from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

One of the cornerstones of the Initiative is a network of CSF Training Partner organizations offering conservation economics training in parts of the world where we do not have our own training teams.  The Network will be supported by CSF and by our academic partners throughout the globe.

CSF awarded $100,000 from Handsel Foundation for work in Africa

CSF was recently awarded $100,000 to expand our trainings, analyses, collaborative field work in Africa, thanks to the generosity of the Handsel Foundation.

Financial incentives for green infrastructure

Series number: 
19

Analysis of Infrastructure from a Conservation Economics Perspective - Bhutan 2014

Twenty-two participants representing 3 countries and 15 organizations attended CSF's Analysis of Infrastructure from a Conservation Economics Perspective course in Bumthang, Bhutan. During the five-day course, participants gained an understanding of our core curriculum which includes Microeconomics, Natural Resource Economics, Environmental Valuation, and Cost-Benefit Analysis. Additional topics tailored for the region and sector of focus included Environmental Management and Policy, Infrastructure Best-Practice, and relevant case studies. Instructors were drawn from CSF, University of Brasilia, and Cambridge Resources International. Many thanks to our partners at UWICE for working with us to put on an excellent training!

 


 

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