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smart energy + transportation infrastructure

Infrastructure investments in remote areas can transform landscapes and watersheds, unleashing irreversible, destructive change. Projects' impacts vary considerably and their approval is dependent on small groups of public decision-makers. Investments, especially remote roads, are often economically inefficient and usually have unnecessarily large environmental and social impacts. These characteristics - variable quality, concentrated decision-making, economic flaws and design shortcomings - add up to a big conservation opportunity, one in which good economic analyses can be influential. CSF's Smart Energy + Transportation Infrastructure program provides training to conservationists and decision-makers, as well as comprehensive cost-benefit analyses of infrastructure projects, such as dams and roads. Keen understanding of these projects at multiple levels of society will result in better decisions and large-scale conservation gains.

Jamaica can have its goat and eat it too

jamaica fishing boat goat islands jamaica portland bight protected area
Lone fishing boat, Jamaica

Jamaica’s Goat Islands are the center of what has often been portrayed as a classic development-versus-environment conflict.

Fishing boat Jamaica Goat Islands port China Harbour Engineering Company

An economic comparison of alternatives to building a port on Goat Islands, Jamaica

In 2013, Jamaica’s Ministry of Transport, Works and Housing announced that the China Harbour Engineering Company (CHEC) had selected the area on and around the Goat Islands to build a major transhipment port and accompanying industrial complex. Due to the location of the proposed site in the core of the Portland Bight Protected Area, reactions have been heated.

The Goat Islands are not the best site for the transshipment port!

An international study shows there may be better, cheaper and less environmentally damaging alternative sites for the proposed transshipment port and logistics hub.

Kingston, Jamaica: The Conservation Strategy Fund (CSF), today announced the findings of a cost-effectiveness assessment of four potential sites for the proposed transshipment port that China Harbour Engineering Company (CHEC) is proposing to build. CSF’s recommendations were presented to a group of senior decision-makers at a meeting at the Courtleigh Hotel today.

The Price is Right, Not

I remember noticing on a trip to Brazil in 2001 that compact-flourescent lightbulbs were colonizing the country's light sockets with startling speed. It hadn't been raining and the drought was idling hydroelectric dams that accounted for more than 90% of electricity. The resulting blackouts, referred to as "apagões," changed people's behavior. Consumers slashed their energy consumption and solved the crisis. The rains eventually came and the outages faded into memory.

Tenosique: Environmental economic analysis of a hydroelectric project on the Usumacinta River

Series number: 
21
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