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smart energy + transportation infrastructure

Infrastructure investments in remote areas can transform landscapes and watersheds, unleashing irreversible, destructive change. Projects' impacts vary considerably and their approval is dependent on small groups of public decision-makers. Investments, especially remote roads, are often economically inefficient and usually have unnecessarily large environmental and social impacts. These characteristics - variable quality, concentrated decision-making, economic flaws and design shortcomings - add up to a big conservation opportunity, one in which good economic analyses can be influential. CSF's Smart Energy + Transportation Infrastructure program provides training to conservationists and decision-makers, as well as comprehensive cost-benefit analyses of infrastructure projects, such as dams and roads. Keen understanding of these projects at multiple levels of society will result in better decisions and large-scale conservation gains.

Estimating Environmental and Biodiversity Costs of Oil Pipeline Development in Murchison Falls National Park, Uganda

Series number: 
10

People, power-lines and nature: Linking countries without losing heritage

Series number: 
27

There is only one place in all the Americas where a person can walk from the Pacifc Ocean to the Atlantic without crossing a road. It’s the so-called Darien Gap in the extreme east of Panama on the border with Colombia. The remote roadless area is home to forests, wetlands and indigenous reserves. Another thing it doesn’t have is electric power-lines. Since 1998 Panama and Colombia have discussed connecting their electric grids to increase flexibility and lower costs. They have generally proposed passing the wires through the Darien Gap. Conservation Strategy Fund joined the Panama Ministry of the Environment recently to examine alternatives to this route, weighing financial construction costs, potential ecological and cultural damage and national security risks.

Análisis comparativo de distintas rutas para la interconexión eléctrica Colombia - Panamá

Series number: 
41

There is only one place in all the Americas where a person can walk from the Pacific Ocean to the Atlantic without crossing a road. It’s the so-called Darien Gap in the extreme east of Panama on the border with Colombia. The remote roadless area is home to forests, wetlands and indigenous reserves. Another thing it doesn’t have is electric power-lines. Since 1998 Panama and Colombia have discussed connecting their electric grids to increase flexibility and lower costs. They have generally proposed passing the wires through the Darien Gap. Conservation Strategy Fund joined the Panama Ministry of the Environment recently to examine alternatives to this route, weighing financial construction costs, potential ecological and cultural damage and national security risks.

Economic impacts of the construction of São Luiz do Tapajós hydroelectric dam

Tapajos Brazil conservation strategy fund

The region of the Tapajós basin is considered the new frontier of energy expansion in Brazil. Specifically the São Luiz do Tapajós hydroelectric project, the largest planned for the basin. If it is built, many ecosystem services will be impacted, influencing the well being of hundreds of local people who depend on them. In this perspective, CSF conducted a study that sought to understand the economic impacts on the services provided to local populations.

CSF-Brazil on a workshop about "Dams in Tapajós River"

On 21st June, CSF-Brazil participated of a workshop about “Dams in Tapajós River”, held in PUC University (Brazil). It was an opportunity to debate with students, professors and other NGOs the subject of huge infrastructures in Amazon and its implications on social and environmental issues.

The Heinrich Böll Stiftung made a report about this event and also an interview with Camila Jericó-Daminello, who is conducting the CSF’s study about the São Luiz do Tapajós dam, planned for the same river.

This was repost with permission from Heinrich Böll Foundation – Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

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A Cost Effectiveness Approach to Routing of Linear Infrastructure in Environmentally Sensitive Areas: A Case of a Crude Oil Pipeline in the Albertine Rift in Uganda

Series number: 
7

CSF begins analysis of proposed dam in Brazil's Tapajós river basin

ecosystem services tapajos para brazil
Tapajós river basin, Pará State, Brazil © Camila Jericó-Daminello

After an inventory of potential dams in the Tapajós river basin was released in 2008, the area has been hailed as the new frontier of energy development in Brazil. Due to the typically extensive environmental and social impacts of dam construction, governments and communities in the Amazon region have been engaged in discussions over the past few years on how to mitigate impacts on people and nature. Some dam projects are already underway with many more on the drawing board.

What is Conservation Economics?

conservation economics CSF strategy fund
Photo credit: Fernanda Preto

There’s no Wikipedia page so you can be forgiven for suspecting that I’m making it up. But Conservation Economics is actually being practiced by a bunch of serious people engaged in one of the most profound challenges of our time - averting massive losses in the diversity of Earth's life forms. So if it doesn’t exist, it’s time we brought it into being. Here goes:

Shansho peru madre de dios jungle amazon environmental compensation

Assessing the Peruvian biodiversity offset scheme and the potential role of protected areas

In December 2014, Peru's Ministry of the Environment made a major policy announcement in a ministerial resolution that established guidelines for developers to offset the residual impacts of their projects. The policy was several years in the making and the product of exhaustive analysis on the part of ministry staff and important policy support from CSF and several other organizations, including the Peruvian Society for Environmental Law, The Nature Conservancy and the Wildlife Conservation Society.

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