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smart energy + transportation infrastructure

Infrastructure investments in remote areas can transform landscapes and watersheds, unleashing irreversible, destructive change. Projects' impacts vary considerably and their approval is dependent on small groups of public decision-makers. Investments, especially remote roads, are often economically inefficient and usually have unnecessarily large environmental and social impacts. These characteristics - variable quality, concentrated decision-making, economic flaws and design shortcomings - add up to a big conservation opportunity, one in which good economic analyses can be influential. CSF's Smart Energy + Transportation Infrastructure program provides training to conservationists and decision-makers, as well as comprehensive cost-benefit analyses of infrastructure projects, such as dams and roads. Keen understanding of these projects at multiple levels of society will result in better decisions and large-scale conservation gains.

Beneficios y costos del mejoramiento de la carretera Charazani - Apolo

Series number: 
14

Effects of Energy and Transportation Projects on Soybean Expansion in the Madeira River Basin

Series number: 
7

Tenosique: análisis económico-ambiental de un proyecto hidroeléctrico en el Río Usumacinta

Series number: 
10

Usumacinta Dam

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p>In a collaborative study by ProNatura Chiapas, Defensores de la Naturaleza, Conservation International and CSF, we analyzed a dam proposed on the Usumacinta River in Mexico. Our objective was to stimulate discussion on the costs and benefits of such projects in Mesoamerica's largest watershed. We chose to analyze the Tenosique project (formerly known as Boca del Cerro), given that it is apparently the dam being given the most serious consideration by planners. We analyzed the project with four criteria in mind: financial feasibility; economic efficiency; the distribution of costs and benefits; and environmental sustainability. A project is considered financially feasible if the firm implementing it receives income in excess of its costs.

Ecoaméricas cites CSF-supported study

Ecoaméricas cites CSF-supported study on roads in the Maya Forest. The study showed that new proposed roads in remote areas of the forest would increase deforestation, spark fires and cause net economic losses to Guatemala and Mexico. In the Americas, the Maya Forest is the largest intact area of rain forest north of the Amazon. It is home to impressive biodiversity, the largest of the ancient mayan cities' ruins, and thriving forest economies.

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