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Alumni Spotlight: An Interview with Sutra Anjani

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CSF alumni Sutra Anjani. Photo credit: Anonymous

One of CSF’s greatest assets is our incredible network of course alumni. We love hearing about how their training with CSF has had an impact on their work and professional development. CSF-Indonesia Program Manager Desta Pratama reached out to Sutra Anjani, currently studying environmental economics at the University of Queensland in Australia, to find out more about her experience with the course she took in 2016 and what she is up to now.

Sintang Consolidation Workshop: A Green District by 2030

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Workshop participants in Sintang. Photo credit: Sopian Hidayat

Bringing economic tools to the mainstream in Indonesia

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CSF Training Director Kim Bonine and course participants working together in Bali. Photo Credit: Imanda Pradana

Fisheries and marine conservation initiatives in Indonesia primarily focus on management of specific species, national and subnational level fisheries policy, and Marine Protected Areas. While such initiatives often use a mix of scientific and socio-economic approaches, economic tools and analysis tend to be underutilized.

West Papua becomes Indonesia’s first Conservation Province

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The spectacular landscape of West Papua. Photo credit: Roderick Eime

2019- 2020 Indonesia Marine Fellows

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Marine Fellows at the Economic Tools course in Bali, Indonesia. Photo credit: Desta Pratama

CSF is proud to introduce our 2019-2020 Indonesia Marine Fellows. Over the next year, these 10 researchers will collect and analyze data to support sustainable fisheries and marine resource policy and management in Indonesia. Read on to learn about their individual projects and policy goals. Stay tuned for more news from the field as these projects develop.

Abdul Malik

Second Sustainable Landscape Planning Workshop in Sintang

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p style="text-align: justify;">Sintang Regency is located in the “Heart of Borneo”, an area of intact forest the size of England and Scotland combined, and home to endangered species including Bornean orangutans, sun bears (Helarctos malayanus), tarsius (Tarsius bancanus), various hornbills and eagles, and other vulnerable species. The more than one million indigenous people living in the forest rely on it for their livelihoods, and millions more depend on the environmental services it provides, like fresh water.

Accelerating fisheries reform through economic analysis and capacity building for Indonesian Fisheries Management Areas

In recent years, Indonesia’s Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries (MMAF) has made bold moves towards fisheries policy reform. Efforts to improve national fisheries management have included combating illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing activities, and bans on destructive fishing gear within Indonesian Fisheries Management Areas (FMAs).

CSF is working with MMAF to develop a coherent national strategy for a sustainable fisheries management, including access, inputs, and output controls, that will maximize the value of Indonesia’s fishery resources.

Specifically, our role includes:

Integrating landscape modeling into sustainable development planning in Sintang

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Sintarum waterfalls in Sintang. Photo credit: CSF

CSF-Indonesia is continuing to work with the government of Sintang to integrate sustainability principles into development planning. From January 15-18, we conducted a workshop on sustainable landscape modeling, building directly on the scenario planning workshop we held in October.

Economic Tools for Marine Conservation & Policy

Have you ever wondered how marine conservation can benefit local fishermen, coastal communities, or people in general? Have you ever considered the benefits of protecting coral reefs, seagrass, and mangroves ecosystems from a human perspective? At Conservation Strategy Fund, we know that understanding the economic costs and benefits of conservation is crucial to success in sustaining natural ecosystems.

ABOUT THE COURSE

Dampak sosial ekonomi kebijakan larangan pukat hela dan pukat tarik di pantai utara jawa

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