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Pilón Lajas Project Update

Pilón Lajas Biosphere Reserve Bolivia Fresh Water Ecosystem Services Water Funds Conservation Finance
Pilón Lajas Biosphere Reserve. Photo credit: Ceci Simon

Last month, we held a series of meetings on the proposed financial mechanism for water conservation in The Pilón Lajas Biosphere Reserve & Communal Lands in Bolivia. On July 9th, we met with indigenous communities, and on July 10th with other stakeholders from the area around the reserve. Both meetings were coordinated with the Regional Council Tsimane Mosetén (CRTM) and the Bolivian National Protected Areas Service (SERNAP).

Exploring Conservation Agreements in the Bolivian Andean Amazon

    Photos for Pilon Lajas News May 2019
Workshop participants in the Real Beni community

Photo Credit:Lilian Apaza

The Pilón Lajas Biosphere Reserve & Communal Lands lies on the eastern slopes of the Andes in northwestern Bolivia. This reserve connects 4 protected areas in Bolivia and Peru, protects safeguards the headwaters of the Alto Beni River, serves to regulate the local water cycle, and is also a hotspot of endemic biodiversity.

Feasibility Analysis for Conservation Agreements in Pilón Lajas Biosphere Reserve and Communal Lands Watersheds

CSF is evaluating the feasibility of conservation agreements to guarantee the protection of the Pilón Lajas Biosphere Reserve and Communal Lands watersheds in Bolivia. Through consultation workshops with various stakeholders, we will consider different financial mechanisms and make recommendations on the best model to be implemented in Pilón Lajas. If we find that conservation agreements are feasible in this area, we will seek to work on the final design and implementation.

Background

Optimizing Bolivia’s Protected Area Fee System

CSF is working closely with SERNAP (Servicio Nacional de Áreas Protegidas, National Service of Protected Areas) on an analysis to review and optimize Bolivia's protected area (PA) fee system. We are providing technical support to optimize and possibly expand the System of Collections (SISCO) to additional PAs. This revision of fees and potential implementation of SISCO to additional areas will be based on quantitative analysis of financial flows, from income generation to distribution back to the PAs. The project also involves coordinated dissemination activities to share and discuss results with SERNAP authorities, PA Directors, and tour operators.

Background

Smart Road Development in the Amazon

Photo Roads Analysis News September
Road in Brazil. Photo credit: Pedarilhos/Shutterstock.com.

CSF has been working with the Moore Foundation, IPAM, and FCDS to identify the relative riskiness of planned roads in the Amazon basin in terms of economic, social and environmental costs. Our goal is to promote better infrastructure decision-making in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru by contributing reliable data to the national road planning process.

CASA Verde: Conservation Finance in Action in Bolivia

For the past year, CSF-Bolivia has been working on an innovative platform called CASA Verde which aims to engage different sectors of Bolivian society including conservation NGOs, private companies, and the general public, who are interested in contributing to environmental conservation. The main objective of CASA Verde is to improve conservation of ecosystems that sustain life and productive activities in Bolivia by promoting greater participation and awareness in society. CASA Verde will also contribute to the implementation of the commitments assumed by Bolivia in the National Development Plan, as well as the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals.

Supporting Smarter Roads Development in the Amazon

TrainingMMAFPhotos
Aerial view of a road through the Amazon forest in Ecuador. Photo credit: Dr. Morley Read

Infrastructure investments in the Amazon can support economic and social development, and bring services to remote populations. However, if poorly planned, they can also result in irreversible, destructive change to the environment and ecosystem services on which communities depend, and lead to inefficient use of economic resources.

Evaluation of the economic, social, and environmental costs of planned road projects in the Amazon Basin

In collaboration with the Amazon Environmental Research Institute (Instituto de Pesquisa Ambiental da Amazônia, IPAM) and the Foundation for Conservation and Sustainable Development (Fundación para la Conservación y el Desarrollo Sostenible, FCDS), CSF has completed a project simultaneously analyzing the economic return, environmental risks, and social impacts of a set of 75 road sections in the Amazon in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. These projects would cover a total distance exceeding 12,000 kilometers.

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