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Does the Maya Forest Need More Roads?

Series number: 
4

Infrastructure Integration and Biodiversity Conservation

From 2004 through 2006, CSF teamed up with the Nature Conservancy and many local organizations on a project to reduce habitat loss resulting from major infrastructure projects. The approach was to better inform stakeholders about the relative economic and environmental merits and impacts of the many construction projects planned for the region. CSF created an inventory of projects, trained conservation leaders in economic tools for project analysis and conducted four field studies. The field studies focused on the proposed roads and dams deemed of greatest environmental concern according to training participants.

Roads in the Selva Maya

An assortment of road projects has been proposed in the border region of Mexico, Guatemala and Belize, which is part of the Maya Forest, the largest contiguous tropical forest in the Americas north of the Amazon. The proposals are apparently aimed at spurring economic growth and reducing the high levels of poverty found in this area. But more and better roads usually bring more people and expand farms. Decision-makers are therefore confronted with a seeming conflict between conservation and development goals. Would new roads be bad or good for the Maya Forest region?

Análisis ambiental y económico de proyectos carreteros en la Selva Maya, un estudio a escala regional

Series number: 
9

Análisis económico y ambiental de carreteras propuestas dentro de la Reserva de la Biosfera Maya

Series number: 
8

Tenosique: análisis económico-ambiental de un proyecto hidroeléctrico en el Río Usumacinta

Series number: 
10
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