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CSF letter published in The Economist

The May 8th - 14th, 2010 edition of The Economist published a letter by President John Reid and CSF course graduate and Fellow Wilson Cabral about the Belo Monte dam. The letter pointed out that the shaky economics of the dam will create pressure for even more dam development upstream of Belo Monte. Construction of the Belo Monte on the Xingu River is rapidly moving forward. But there are positive aspects to this story. A delay in the project of several years, partly due to CSF's 2006 study of the dam, has given time for protected areas and a big new carbon project to be consolidated. This will make it harder for additional big dams, which are the real threat, to be built upstream of Belo Monte on the Xingu.

CSF launches YouTube channel

Conservation Strategy Fund has launched a YouTube channel. We will feature videos on CSF projects, courses, staff and student profiles, and informational films. Please subscribe so you can stay up to date with any videos we post.

http://www.youtube.com/user/numbers4nature

CSF launches new video on International Training

Watch this short video and hear from our students why they attended our 11th annual International Training in Economic Tools for Conservation at Stanford University in California in August 2009. The students came from all corners of the globe: Indonesia, Cameroon, Haiti, Bhutan, Colombia, Brazil and beyond. Watch the video, below, or by clicking here for our You Tube site.

CSF President John Reid is Featured in The Katoomba Group Ecosystem Marketplace

Photos of John Reid, CSF President

Read about how CSF got its start and what inspired John to begin teaching others how to use economics to conserve the environment. John Reid: Teaching Ecologists the Economics of Nature

CSF launches HydroCalculator Tool

Photos of Madden Dam in Panama

CSF has just developed an innovative online HydroCalculator Tool that empowers citizens to analyze the ecological, social, and financial impacts of hydroelectric dams.

http://www.conservation-strategy.org/hydrocalculator-analyses

CSF Amazon BR-319 Road study featured in The Katoomba Group Ecosystem Marketplace

Photos of BR-319 Road in Brazilian Amazon

New Development and Ecosystem Service Roadkill by John Reid, Leonardo Fleck, and Marcos Amend featured in The Katoomba Group's Ecosystem Marketplace http://ecosystemmarketplace.com/pages/article.opinion.php?component_id=6...

Ocean Economics - Coiba National Park, Panama

Conservation Strategy Fund (CSF) conducted economic valuation research of Marine areas in Belize, Panama, and Brazil. This work was supported by Conservation International’s Marine Management Area Science program and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation. Valuation of ecosystem goods and services was carried out within three formally protected marine areas: Gladden Spit (Belize), Coiba (Panama) and Abrolhos (Brazil). CSF's Coiba research was led by one of our training graduates, Ricardo Montenegro, of the Alliance for Conservation and Development, a Panamanian NGO.

International Economic Tools Course August 10-21, Stanford University, USA

Course participants at Golden Gate Bridge

CSF held its 2009 International Economic Tools Course from August 10-12, 2009 at Stanford University in California, USA.

During the two-week course, participants learned to use economics to be more strategic and successful in their conservation work. Participants studied natural resource and environmental economics, practiced communication and negotiation techniques, and got hands-on experience with cost-benefit analysis.

Ecoaméricas cites CSF-supported study

Ecoaméricas cites CSF-supported study on roads in the Maya Forest. The study showed that new proposed roads in remote areas of the forest would increase deforestation, spark fires and cause net economic losses to Guatemala and Mexico. In the Americas, the Maya Forest is the largest intact area of rain forest north of the Amazon. It is home to impressive biodiversity, the largest of the ancient mayan cities' ruins, and thriving forest economies.