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From all of us at CSF: Thank you!

Happy Holidays, Felizes Fiestas, Boas Festas, Selamat Berlibur

Every day, support from donors like you makes our work possible. Are you willing to make a special year-end donation to help us protect ecosystems around the world?

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Value chain mapping results presented in Northern Brazil

On September 30th and 31st, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and CSF presented the first results of the “Sustainable Fisheries in the Amazon Coast Project" to our partners in São Luís, Brazil. Sixty representatives from government, universities, the private sector, civil society, associations, cooperatives, fishermen groups, trade unions, and the implementing partners attended the meeting.

CSF Encontro Parceiros São Luís Cadeias de ValorFernanda Alvarenga introducing CSF´s work.

Plans for Amazon Dam Cancelled

ecosystem services tapajos para brazil
Tapajós river basin, Pará State, Brazil © Camila Jericó-Daminello

On August 4, Brazil's federal environmental agency, IBAMA, formally suspended the environmental licensing process for a proposed dam on the Tapajós River, a "blue water" tributary of the Amazon. The river flows from the south, off Brazil's central plateau, its clear waters sculpting white sand beaches and it winds toward the main stem of the Amazon.

CSF Graduate Fernando León Named Vice Minister of Environment in Peru

 

Photo for Vice Minister Fernando Leon Post

Vice Minister Fernando León (second from left) with Felipe Vásquez (CSF Fellows Mentor, left) and CSF staff members Cristian Vallejos, Rocío Moreno, Aaron Bruner and Alfonso Malky during the 2nd ICAA Fellows selection workshop in Arashá, Ecuador, July 2013.

BUILD Synthesis Report

From 2011-2015, CSF engaged in a comprehensive global initiative through the Biodiversity Understanding in Infrastructure and Landscape Development (BUILD) program of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). This report highlights key elements of this multi-year, multi-continent set of infrastructure related projects, and includes an appendix of all activities by region.

CSF begins analysis of proposed dam in Brazil's Tapajós river basin

ecosystem services tapajos para brazil
Tapajós river basin, Pará State, Brazil © Camila Jericó-Daminello

After an inventory of potential dams in the Tapajós river basin was released in 2008, the area has been hailed as the new frontier of energy development in Brazil. Due to the typically extensive environmental and social impacts of dam construction, governments and communities in the Amazon region have been engaged in discussions over the past few years on how to mitigate impacts on people and nature. Some dam projects are already underway with many more on the drawing board.

CSF brings together journalists and conservation experts at forum in Brasilia

On November 12th, in Brasília, Brazil, 30 journalists from the Amazonian regional media as well as from the national and international outlets attended an infrastructure-focused workshop organized by CSF-Brasil. These professionals hailed from various organizations including O Eco, IPAM, IMAZON, WWF, and TNC. John Lyons of the Wall Street Journal, Wilson Cabral of Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica, and Paul E. Little, anthropologist and infrastructure expert, were also in attendance. Speakers shared information about the impacts of infrastructure projects on ecosystem services in the Amazon. The event provided a forum to discuss infrastructure project planning as well as key environmental, social, economic and legal issues that need to be understood by society.

Sustainable Business in the Brazilian Amazon

Conservation Strategy Fund has been working with traditional communities in Brazil to support low-impact activities in the Amazon region. These activities have subsequently grown into sustainable businesses, from both an environmental and economic perspective. The guidance CSF has given these locally-owned businesses has helped them to grow substantially and aims to eventually contribute to decreased deforestation in Brazil.

Imazon: Brazilian parks near big infrastructure are more deforested

That doesn't really seem like news. We've known for a long time, intuitively and then empirically, that deforestation happens in places with easier access. Roads in the Amazon and other remote regions have been the most important vectors of deforestation. Farming in places where you can get supplies in and produce out cheaply is economically attractive.

Filtro de carreteras: identificando proyectos viales de alto riesgo en la cuenca amazónica

Series number: 
14
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