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Local economic costs of the proposed Isiolo dam: A scoping study

CSF conducted a desk-based study of potential local costs associated with the construction of the proposed Isiolo Dam in the Ewaso Ng’iro River in Kenya.

The dam has been identified by Kenya’s National Water Conservation and Pipeline Corporation as necessary to improve local livelihood by providing water for domestic and livestock use, small irrigation activities, and in the future, for tourists in the proposed Isiolo Resort City.

However, there has also been opposition to the proposed construction, based on concerns that the dam could expose herders downstream to drought, negatively affect endangered wildlife, and put the local wildlife-tourism based economy at risk.

Marañón: The social and environmental costs of five hydroelectric projects

Marañon river Amazon basin Peru hydroelectric project

Fisherman on the Marañon river. Photo credit: Jose Carlos Rubio

The Marañón River contributes about ten percent of the total water discharged by the Amazon river into the Atlantic Ocean, and transports approximately forty percent of all sediments carried in the Peruvian part of the Amazon watershed. Along with the Ucayali and Madre de Dios rivers, it is one of the main tributaries of the Amazon basin in Peru.

Marañón: Costo social de los impactos acumulativos de cinco proyectos hidroeléctricos

Series number: 
50

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São Luiz do Tapajós Dam Construction: Economic Impact and Analysis of Ecosystem Services’ Provision

CSF conducted a study on the economic impact that São Luiz do Tapajós could have had on local populations if its construction in the Brazilian Amazon had been approved.

We analyzed the loss of subsistence income and the impact on two ecosystem services: water quality reduction and the increase of CO2 equivalent emissions.

CSF Tajapós Dam impactsTraditional houses in the Tapajós riverside.

Economic impacts of the "São Luiz do Tapajós" dam’s construction: an analysis of ecosystem services’ provision

Series number: 
48

You can learn more about this project by reading our blog posts on the  field trips, project progress, workshops and events, as well as local news related to the project region.

Economic tools training for mangrove ecosystems in Brazil

The five-day Economic Tools for Conservation of Mangroves in Protected Areas course was held at the Center for Research and Conservation of Northeast Marine Biodiversity (CEPENE), located in the city of Tamandaré, in Pernambuco state, in northeastern Brazil.

It was attended by twenty-five members of the Chico Mendes Institute for Conservation of Biodiversity (ICMBio), responsible for managing protected areas with mangroves from ten states in Brazil.

Water Services and Protected Areas in Peru

Similar to other national protected areas' systems across the world, Peru’s national parks are underfunded. SERNANP, the national protected areas agency, is currently evaluating the funding needs of the national parks under its responsibility, to prepare a plan to address this gap. The Project Finance for Permanence initiative (or Patrimonio del Peru–PdP, as known locally) is based on similar experiences in Brazil and Costa Rica, where governments and donors agree to provide funding to permanently support the financial needs of the protected areas, while contributions are conditional to compliance with commitments to achieve protection goals and increase public funding for protected areas, within an agreed period of time.

Economic Analysis of Hydroelectric Projects in the Marañón River Basin

The Marañón River, along with the Ucayali and Madre de Dios rivers, is one of the main tributaries of the Amazon in Peru. The Marañón basin also concentrates many of the planned hydroelectric projects in Peru. More than 20 dams, of which at least six are in advanced stages of planning or execution, can significantly affect the biodiversity and environmental services provided by this key basin of the Amazon.

The impacts of these projects are not limited to their direct effects (flooded towns and crops, displaced communities, deforestation, habitat loss, etc.), but also result in compounded impacts in terms of the hydrological cycles, sediment and nutrient transport, interruption of fish migratory and reproduction routes, and alteration of the flooding regime in the Amazon plains.

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