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Game Theory Goes Native

conservation economics CSF strategy fund

Game theory emerged in the 1940’s as a math-driven, esoteric science of how people alternately cooperate and compete to get what they want. It’s been used in business, diplomacy and military strategies and won famed Princeton economist John Nash the Nobel Prize in 1994. Now, far from the halls of academia and the corridors of power, it’s also being used to conserve nature.

Community Cost-Benefit Analysis

success stories conservation economics CSF strategy fund

In September 2009, Theresa Kas visited the small village of Sohoneliu in the Manus Province of her native Papua New Guinea. It was a dramatic change of scenery from Stanford, where, a month earlier, she had completed Conservation Strategy Fund’s international “Economic Tools for Conservation” course. Kas, who works with The Nature Conservancy, saw that deforestation was on the rise and traditional hunting was dwindling, and wondered if the local economy’s resource base was careening toward collapse. So she pulled out her CSF notes and put them to use.

CSF awarded $100,000 grant from Margaret A. Cargill Foundation

In November, the Margaret A. Cargill Foundation's Environment Program awarded CSF $100,000 as part of our expanding marine initiative. This award will fund a decision-makers workshop and a mentored groundwork field analysis.

Economic Tools for Marine Conservation in the Western Pacific - Palau 2014

"The amount of information given to me was huge and has, over a very short time, significantly altered my mentality as a conservationist/biologist. I'll cherish that for the rest of my career." --Palau 2014 Course Participant

Packard Foundation Supports CSF Oceans Work

The David and Lucile Packard Foundation recently awarded CSF a grant to expand our ocean conservation work, with a focus on the islands of Micronesia. Packard will join CSF in delivering conservation economics training in Palau, a global priority for protection of reefs and associated coastal ecosystems. CSF will work with environmental managers and decision makers on integrating economic data and insights into management of fisheries and marine protected areas. Complementing the training will be a detailed analysis of sustainability and the distribution of profits from the economically significant sea cucumber industry.

Notes from the Field: Economic analysis in the Western Pacific

February was a month of non-stop travel for me. Having just started working with CSF I got shipped off on a whirlwind tour of Micronesia and Bali. Not a bad start I suppose!

How to make marine PES work

Series number: 
15

Estimating the value of restoring coastal environments in the Marshall Islands

CSF is partnering with the Marshall Islands Marine Resources Authority (MIMRA) and the Marshall Islands Conservation Society (MICS) to analyze the economic benefits of protecting or restoring coastal and marine areas in Majuro Atoll in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) from damaging activities such as overfishing, mining, and pollution. The project will also consider the role of marine and terrestrial protected areas in maintaining or enhancing these benefits.

Sustainable economic development in Yap

CSF is helping Yap State in the Federated States of Micronesia design a framework for sustainable economic development. Key stakeholders will explore scenarios for future development, learn how to measure environmental, social, cultural and economic impacts of different types of programs, and evaluate the potential of proposed projects to achieve sustainable development. This effort is one of several analysis projects being conducted in Micronesia following CSF's Economic Tools for Conservation in Micronesia course held in March of 2012.

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