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Online Coastal Conservation Economics Course

In May, 28 people completed our first online course in Coastal Conservation Economics. This course was offered in partnership with Duke University and sponsored by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation as part of our Conservation Economics Initiative.

“I was really impressed overall with the level of instructors on this course and their very thoughtful presentations. I also appreciated the inclusion of real-life examples throughout the presentations of how the principles are applied to policy or management decisions. Thank you to everyone involved for all your hard work putting this course together!” -2015 online course graduate

The Market Tames a Lion

LionfishLionfish ready for the pan at Cozumel Fishermen's Coop © John Reid

In 1992 Hurricane Andrew liberated a tankful of lionfish from a Florida aquarium. More may have been dumped in the sea before then and after, but the event stuck in the collective imagination as the start of a biological invasion.

CSF and GIZ supporting mangrove conservation through better economics in Ecuador

equadorian mangrovesMangroves on the Equador coastline. © Ammit Jack

Since 2008, Ecuador’s Socio Bosque Program has been protecting the country’s environment through incentive payments to individual and community land owners. Socio Bosque has to date protected nearly 1.3 million hectares of important habitat. In 2013, the government decided to expand the program to mangroves, one of the most productive and threatened ecosystems in the world.

Value-chain analysis of sea cucumber fisheries

CSF is partnering with the government of Ngardmau State, Palau, to conduct a value-chain analysis of their sea cucumber fishery. For the community of Ngardmau, sea cucumbers represent an important species culturally and, if managed properly, have the potential to significantly improve economic conditions in the area. The second highest-valued export commodity within the Pacific, sea cucumbers are among the few resources that can deliver profits at the village level.

Game Theory Goes Native

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Game theory emerged in the 1940’s as a math-driven, esoteric science of how people alternately cooperate and compete to get what they want. It’s been used in business, diplomacy and military strategies and won famed Princeton economist John Nash the Nobel Prize in 1994. Now, far from the halls of academia and the corridors of power, it’s also being used to conserve nature.

Community Cost-Benefit Analysis

success stories conservation economics CSF strategy fund

In September 2009, Theresa Kas visited the small village of Sohoneliu in the Manus Province of her native Papua New Guinea. It was a dramatic change of scenery from Stanford, where, a month earlier, she had completed Conservation Strategy Fund’s international “Economic Tools for Conservation” course. Kas, who works with The Nature Conservancy, saw that deforestation was on the rise and traditional hunting was dwindling, and wondered if the local economy’s resource base was careening toward collapse. So she pulled out her CSF notes and put them to use.

CSF awarded $100,000 grant from Margaret A. Cargill Foundation

In November, the Margaret A. Cargill Foundation's Environment Program awarded CSF $100,000 as part of our expanding marine initiative. This award will fund a decision-makers workshop and a mentored groundwork field analysis.

Economic Tools for Marine Conservation in the Western Pacific - Palau 2014

"The amount of information given to me was huge and has, over a very short time, significantly altered my mentality as a conservationist/biologist. I'll cherish that for the rest of my career." --Palau 2014 Course Participant

Packard Foundation Supports CSF Oceans Work

The David and Lucile Packard Foundation recently awarded CSF a grant to expand our ocean conservation work, with a focus on the islands of Micronesia. Packard will join CSF in delivering conservation economics training in Palau, a global priority for protection of reefs and associated coastal ecosystems. CSF will work with environmental managers and decision makers on integrating economic data and insights into management of fisheries and marine protected areas. Complementing the training will be a detailed analysis of sustainability and the distribution of profits from the economically significant sea cucumber industry.

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